The 41 Most Amazing Faces and Places on Nat Geo’s Instagram

Since forever, National Geographic has been at the forefront of photography. So, when Instagram came along, they were a natural fit. With over 30 million followers and billions of likes from around the world, @NatGeo is one of the most liked accounts on Insta. Here are some places and faces to prove it.  Also, you can use your Goodshop account to support Nat Geo when you shop! (Learn more about how Goodshop works with this fun graphic.)

Photo by @joelsartore | The Lemur Leaf Frog is a critically endangered species that historically occurred in Costa Rica, south through Panama into Colombia. They have suffered an estimated 80% loss of population in the last fifteen years and are still in decline. The Lemur Leaf Frog pictured here was bred in captivity from frogs collected in central Panama (El Valle de Antón) during a 2005 expedition to the region. This was part of a collaborative effort by @atlbotanical @zooatl and El Valle Amphibian Conservation Center to rescue amphibian populations from the emergent infectious disease — chytridiomycosis. This fungus, nicknamed 'chytrid' devastated 85% of the Panamanian amphibians from the area. That was ten years ago, and the Lemur Leaf Frogs collected as well as other Panamanian species are housed in the #frogPOD — a biosecure facility at the Atlanta Botanical Garden where the frogs can be studied, and bred in captivity. In critical situations like this, frogs are kept in captive assurance colonies until they can once again be safe in the wild. For updates on this particular group of Panamanian frogs and the frogPOD, please check out @frogsneedourhelp. Follow me at @joelsartore to see more stunning creatures from the #PhotoArk. #photooftheday

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@stevewinterphoto on #assignment for @natgeo A leopard in a tree getting ready to jump down after feeding on the antelope above her. She is trying to find a way out btw the hyenas circling below her on the ground. This is in the Timbavati of South Africa. I’m just finished shooting my worldwide #leopard story, for @natgeo showcasing the world’s most adaptable, but persecuted, big cat. And for Nat Geo Wild a one hour TV program! From the wilds of #SouthAfrica to the heart of #Mumbai and Sir Lanka. National Geographic launched the Big Cats Initiative to raise awareness and implement change to the dire situation facing big cats. Please visit CauseAnUproar.org to find out more about Build a Boma and other ways to become involved to save big cats! Give a High 5 for big cats! #5forbigcats and www.causeanuproar.org @stevewinterphoto @natgeo @nglive #nglive #ngwild @ngwild @natgeowild #natgeowild @thephotosociety #NGcreative @natgeocreative #fursforlife #wildlifeconservation #inthefield #wildlifephotojournalism #BCI #bigcatsintiative #photooftheday #beauty

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Photo by @amivitale #onassignment in China for @natgeo. A baby panda in a basket at the Bifengxia Giant Panda Breeding and Research Center in Sichuan Province. I am in China to document this year’s bumper crop of baby pandas born at the breeding center. I'm grateful for the rare and exclusive access into the world of pandas. I want to explore how an animal this elusive and rare became so beloved and popular. The giant panda was not known outside of China until 1869; incredible when you think about their indisputable global appeal today. Follow me @amivitale for more adorable pandas. @ipandacam @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #pandas #babypandas #yaan #bifengxia #sichuan #conservation #natureisspeaking #china #animals #wildlife #photooftheday #photography #nature #seetheworld #photojournalism #amivitale

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Photograph by @thomaspeschak The Seychelles Islands in the Indian Ocean are home to the Aldabra Giant Tortoise, a behemoth of a reptile that can weight more than 600 lbs. Nearly eaten to extinction by European Sailors in the 18th century, by 1840 they only survived on the remote atoll of Aldabra. In modern times, thanks to the dedicated efforts of conservationists, these tortoises have been re-introduced to other islands in the Seychelles. This tortoise roams on D'arros, an island in the Amirantes chain where scientific research and conservation initiatives are managed by the @saveourseasfondation. Shot on assignment for @natgeo magazine for a forthcoming feature story on conservation and island restoration in the Seychelles. #jurassicworld #jurassicpark #dinosaurs #seychelles #island #prehistoric @natgeocreative

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Photograph by @paulnicklen for @natgeo. After a long dive into the cave systems near Tulum, Mexico, we see the light of the cave entrance for the first time in a long time. It is always a refreshing sight but the stunning views inside these intricate and mysterious caves are hard to describe. In the Yucatan Peninsula, there are no above ground rivers however, thousands of kilometers of rivers run underground making for endless cave exploration. Soon, I will be editing my favorite cave diving video clip of all time on @paulnicklen so please #follow me. It was during our descent to photograph the oldest discovered #FirstAmerican. With @betonava and@cristinamittermeier #discovery @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #diving #rebreather #gratitude

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Photo by @mattiasklumofficial for @natgeo. Man of the forest! One of my first dreams as a young boy was to go to Borneo, venture inside to find and photograph wild orangutans like this male in Danum Valley, Sabah, Malaysia. (Please go to @mattiasklumofficial to meet a ridiculously cute baby orangutan)! Now years later, (27 to be precise …) since my first encounter with these remarkable primates, I am as excited now as back then every time a meet with the "man of the forest"! By now I have spent years in Borneo and many months up in the canopy moulding away in hides and blinds to get the orang-images needed for magazine stories, books and films. Orangutans spend much of their time (some 90 percent) in the trees of their tropical rain forest home so there are really no shortcuts if you want to get the best images. Orangutans sleep aloft in nests of leafy branches that they make late every afternoon. They frequently use large leaves as umbrellas and shelters to protect themselves from the tropical rains. Orangutans are more solitary than other apes. Males are loners and as they move through the forest they make howling calls to ensure that they stay out of each other's way. The "long call" can be heard at least 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) away. Mothers and their young, however, share a strong bond. Infants will stay with their mothers for some six or seven years until they develop the skills to survive on their own. Since orangutans live in only a few places in Sumatra and Borneo and because they are so dependent upon a multitude of trees, they are particularly susceptible to logging. Unfortunately, deforestation and other human activities, such as hunting and the palm oil industry have placed the orangutan in danger of extinction. @mattiasklumofficial #orangutan #danumvalley #borneo #malaysia @wwf #mattiasklum #instagood #rainforest @natgeo @thephotosociety @natgeocreative @bigworldsmallplanet

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National Geographic Photographer @thomaspeschak capturing seals surfing underwater. "I had been watching these seals for years and wanted to photograph them surfing from a unique underwater perspective for my @natgeo magazine article on southern African marine reserves. However when the waves were really big and the seals were surfing almost constantly it was too dangerous to get into the water. I saw a lot of days with dramatic photo potential, but the waves were just too big. Then when it was safe the seals weren’t surfing or the water was murky. Then came the perfect day. There was no wind, the ocean was glassy smooth and perfectly sized sets of large waves rolled in and most importantly the seals were surfing en masse. This is a photograph of me shooting beneath the breakers taken by naturalist, dive guide and my frequent assistant @animal_ocean Please follow him for more fantastic seal images. #surfing #seals #southafrica @thephotosociety @natgeocreative

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After lowering gear all morning from the extreme heat of the Yucatan Peninsula, into the depths of this cenote, my partner @cristinamittermeier takes a dip into the cool waters in this beautiful cavernous swimming hole. I had already framed up the Mayan skulls for a shot with the shafts of light and loved how this serendipitous and tender moment appeared connecting the surface world with the dark secrets of an eerie past. There are no above ground rivers in the Yucatan and all the water runs through and underground maze of subterranean rivers. Occasionally, the ground breaks to reveal one of these waterways to form beautiful cenotes. Dozens of tourists swim here every day completely unaware of the large ancient Mayan burial site just below the surface. Ancient Maya believed that the rain god Chaak resided in caves and natural wells called cenotes and that is where they buried the human sacrifices they made to call for rain. As I approach 1 million followers on @paulnicklen I can’t express my gratitude enough for the chance to work for the best journalistic publication in the world. Thank you @natgeo for all of life changing opportunities to explore, photograph and share stories from the most remote corners of the planet. I am also grateful for the incredible people I get to work with and most of all, I am grateful to all of the wildlife that has allowed me to tell their story. Please #follow me as we pursue the next chapter of this journey and share those images and stories on #instagram #gratitude #nature #wildlife #keepitwild #@natgeo @thephotosociety @natgeocreative #love #beauty #love #culture #diving #rebreather #light

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Photo @coryrichards On assignment with @natgeo with @intotheokavango going source to sand doing a scientific and socioeconomic transect of the Okavango Delta on the Cuito River. The water of the delta and the ecosystem it supports, like this intent leopard on Chief's Island, are all fed by water flowing south from the Angolan Highlands. Angola's war had a massive impact on game in the highlands, forcing most of it out. As the expedition has traveled south into areas less affected, the game gradually returns. In time, the landscapes of the upper Cuito can support the wildlife that is now absent if the river is left to its natural flow. Animals can and will eventually repopulate if given the chance. The Cuito's future will depend on Angola's management and the help of its neighbors, Namibia and Botswana. Without a collaborative effort, the Delta itself will feel the effect, along with all the animals it supports, including us. For more images follow @coryrichards and @intotheokavango Posted from the field. @thephotosociety @natgeocreative @eddiebauer #okavango15

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Photo by @argonautphoto (Aaron Huey). This is one of those places in the world that draws me back again and again. The Milky Way over #MatoTipila, Wyoming (Bear Lodge), also/unfortunately known as #DevilsTower. The areas surrounding this 867 ft tall volcanic plug have long been a place where plains tribes went for Hanbleceya, or vision quest. It is a place sacred to Native and Non-Native peoples and a Mecca for rock climbers. I spent part of this weekend at "The Tower" assisting my 5 year old son @hawkeyehuey with his photo project, and filming with @jaredleto and @renanozturk for the #GreatWideOpen project. Follow @argonautphoto and @hawkeyehuey for more images of this amazing National Monument over the coming days!

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Photo by @mattiasklumofficial. A pair of ice bergs shaped by water, sun and wind float near the Antarctic peninsula, just like pieces of art in the most beautiful outdoor exhibit space imaginable. Please go to @mattiasklumofficial to meet a Gentoo penguin dressed for Nobel! Ice sheets cover around 98% of Antarctica’s surface and contains 90% of the world’s ice and 70% of the world’s fresh water. It' s thickest point is a staggering 4.7 km (2.92 miles) deep. The Antarctic Ice Sheet covers an area larger than the U.S. and Mexico combined. Now this unique system is changing and this distressing change represents an impending threat to a number of sensitive species, as well to destabilizing one of our most crucial biomes for global climate regulation. Shot on assignment with @monikaklum #antarctica #polar #savingantarctica #stopclimatechange #bwsp #expedition #mattiasklum #passion #art #fineart #ice #icebergs #UN #IQ #SDGS #exhibit @thephotosociety @natgeocreative @bigworldsmallplanet @natgeo

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Photo by @mattiasklumofficial A female polar bear greeting one of her cubs near the gorgeous Nordenskiöld glacier, Svalbard. Polar bear cubs drink their mother's milk and depend on her for survival for at least 20 months. Please go to @mattiasklumofficial to see her beautiful morning stretch! Her hunting skill and success is critical for her own survival and for feeding and teaching her cubs to find food for themselves. According to scientists like Alison Ames, Polar bears may be just as smart as some apes. Their success at hunting seals in a dynamic arctic environment is one sign of their brain power. "This is learned behavior and reveals that polar bears are very intelligent animals. They are highly cognitive creatures that top the food chain in polar regions. You have to be very clever to do that. Hunting and trapping a seal is no easy matter." – Alison Ames #svalbard #polar #polarbears #arctic #savingthearctic #stopclimatechange #bwsp #expedition #mattiasklum #cubs #UN #mom #IQ #SDGS #predator @natgeocreative @thephotosociety @bigworldsmallplanet @natgeo

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